Google One VPN for iPhone Now Available to Use

iPhone owners can now starting using the Google One VPN if they pay for 2TB or more for Google One storage.

Privacy and security are always core to everything we make. Our systems have advanced security built in to help ensure no one uses the VPN to tie your online activity to your identity. Our client libraries are also open sourced, and our end-to-end systems have been independently audited. Our VPN has the full certification from the Internet of Secure Things Alliance (ioXt) and passed all eight of ioXt’s security principles.

Update: According to MacRumors, the Google One app is no longer available through the App Store.

Google Topics Will Categorize Your Browsing for Advertising

Google Topics will track your browsing and divvy it up into 300 categories for advertising. It replaces Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC).

When you hit upon a site that supports the Topics API for ad purposes, the browser will share three topics you are interested in — one for each of the three last weeks — selected randomly from your top five topics of each week. The site can then share this with its advertising partners to decide which ads to show you. Ideally, this would make for a more private method of deciding which ad to show you — and Google notes that it also provides users with far greater control and transparency than what’s currently the standard. Users will be able to review and remove topics from their lists — and turn off the entire Topics API, too.

 

Google's Project Zero Deep Dives into NSO Group 'FORCEDENTRY' Exploit

Google’s Project Zero security team published a deep dive into FORCEDENTRY, a zero-click exploit in iMessage used by NSO Group. Apple’s Security Engineering and Architecture (SEAR) group collaborated on the analysis.

Based on our research and findings, we assess this to be one of the most technically sophisticated exploits we’ve ever seen, further demonstrating that the capabilities NSO provides rival those previously thought to be accessible to only a handful of nation states.

The vulnerability discussed in this blog post was fixed on September 13, 2021 in iOS 14.8 as CVE-2021-30860.

Google Sets Out Plan For News Content to French Antitrust Regulator

Google has set out a plan for paying news agencies and publishers to French antitrust regulators. The proposals will now be put to public consultation, with responses required by January 31, 2022, Reuters reported. Google’s influence on the news business is obviously far more significant than Apple’s, although I imagine Cupertino will be keeping a keen eye on how this plays out.

News organizations, which have been losing ad revenue to online aggregators such as Google and Facebook (FB.O), have complained for years about tech companies using stories in search results or other features without copyright payment. As part of its proposals, Google commits to negotiate “in good faith” with news agencies and publishers the amount it would pay for using their protected content. It also commits to making a payment offer within three months from the start of the negotiation. If a deal cannot be reached, it would be possible to go to an arbitration court that would decide on the amount to pay.

YouTube Moves to Hide Dislike Count From User Interface

YouTube announced on Wednesday that it will begin hiding the number of dislikes videos have on its platform.

And earlier this year, we experimented with the dislike button to see whether or not changes could help better protect our creators from harassment, and reduce dislike attacks — where people work to drive up the number of dislikes on a creator’s videos.

YouTube is only making it harder to spot crappy videos at a distance. Now you’ll have to click on each video to be sure, or read the comments. More views = more money for Google.