What’s new in 2011?

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    Posted: 02 January 2011 09:38 PM #31

    Oh yes, of course. Pages, Numbers and Keystone will be seriously upgraded to be acceptable replacements for Office counterparts, then be individually sold at the App Store at an appropriate price.

         
  • Posted: 02 January 2011 10:48 PM #32

    MacGuffin - 02 January 2011 07:51 PM
    FalKirk - 01 January 2011 10:27 PM

    I predict that when Apple reports earnings on the 18th of January, they will report massive numbers coming out of the Mac App Store which opened only 12 days earlier on the 6th of January.

    I do of course feel the Mac App Store will be successful, however I’m not quite sure it will be such the tidal wave that you are expecting initially. After all, practically everything it will be offering is already out there for purchase today, so it’s not a direct parallel to when the iPhone App Store opened, which was of course the first day ever that you could get your hands on any of the software (in non-Safari form) and expand your hardware’s capability. I doubt that people have been holding off on their Mac software purchases for the past few months just so that they could buy them from Apple instead of the developer.

    The Mac Operating System was created in 1984, some twenty-six years ago. The iOS App store was created in June 2008, some two and a half years ago. The Mac probably has had, in its entire history, less than 100,000 viable applications. The App store has, in its brief history, had 300,000 apps and counting. Mac owners probably buy less than 20 applications throughout the life of their machine. iOS owners often buy 50 applications the first week that they own their device, with many devices holding literarily hundreds of applications. The Mac applications one owns may be few, but they can run one hundreds, or even thousands of dollars. Many of the iOS applications are free, but few begrudge spending 20, 40 or 50 dollars to fill their devices with Apps. I bought my current MacBook in 2006 and I can’t recall buying a single third party application for it. I bought my daughter an iPod Touch for Christmas and it is chock full of applications that I downloaded for her before Christmas and it is becoming ever fuller each day with applications that she’s downloaded since.

    Here’s what’s going to happen. 1) A slew of free and lower priced applications are going to make their appearance. 2) There is going to be an explosion of entirely new, never before seen applications on the Mac. 3) Developers are going to make, and owners are going to buy, applications that duplicate the applications that they already have on their iOS devices. This is going to be true even of applications like Pandora that can be accessed from the web and don’t require applications. People are going to want to replicate the functionality of their iOS devices on their desktops. 4) An entirely new wave of developers is going to appear, as if from thin air. 5) People are going to start using their Macs in ways that no one has ever thought of using them before. 6) There are going to be games, games, games and more games. EDIT: 7) And another thing. The Mac App Store will help to sell a whole boatload of new Macs.

    As you can tell, I’m all in on this. We will start to feel the impact of the Mac App Store within six months and within a year, everybody will acknowledge that Apple has, once again, revolutionized computing.

    Of course, I could be wrong about all of this. But I’m not.

    [ Edited: 02 January 2011 11:01 PM by FalKirk ]      
  • Posted: 02 January 2011 11:22 PM #33

    FalKirk - 03 January 2011 02:48 AM

    1) A slew of free and lower priced applications are going to make their appearance. 2) There is going to be an explosion of entirely new, never before seen applications on the Mac. 3) Developers are going to make, and owners are going to buy, applications that duplicate the applications that they already have on their iOS devices. This is going to be true even of applications like Pandora that can be accessed from the web and don’t require applications. People are going to want to replicate the functionality of their iOS devices on their desktops. 4) An entirely new wave of developers is going to appear, as if from thin air. 5) People are going to start using their Macs in ways that no one has ever thought of using them before. 6) There are going to be games, games, games and more games. EDIT: 7) And another thing. The Mac App Store will help to sell a whole boatload of new Macs.

    We really need to get James Earl Jones to do the voice over for this to give it that little extra impact.  smile

    “Oh, people will come, Ray. People will most definitely come.”

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  • Posted: 03 January 2011 01:35 AM #34

    BillH - 03 January 2011 03:22 AM
    FalKirk - 03 January 2011 02:48 AM

    1) A slew of free and lower priced applications are going to make their appearance. 2) There is going to be an explosion of entirely new, never before seen applications on the Mac. 3) Developers are going to make, and owners are going to buy, applications that duplicate the applications that they already have on their iOS devices. This is going to be true even of applications like Pandora that can be accessed from the web and don’t require applications. People are going to want to replicate the functionality of their iOS devices on their desktops. 4) An entirely new wave of developers is going to appear, as if from thin air. 5) People are going to start using their Macs in ways that no one has ever thought of using them before. 6) There are going to be games, games, games and more games. EDIT: 7) And another thing. The Mac App Store will help to sell a whole boatload of new Macs.

    We really need to get James Earl Jones to do the voice over for this to give it that little extra impact.  smile

    “Oh, people will come, Ray. People will most definitely come.”

    I AM James Earl Jones. Didn’t you know that? And you’ve used the wrong quote from the wrong movie:

    “Luke, if only you could FEEL the power of the dark side of the Mac App Store. And yes Luke, I may be your Father, but Steve Jobs is your Daddy!”

         
  • Posted: 03 January 2011 01:47 AM #35

    FalKirk - 03 January 2011 05:35 AM
    BillH - 03 January 2011 03:22 AM
    FalKirk - 03 January 2011 02:48 AM

    1) A slew of free and lower priced applications are going to make their appearance. 2) There is going to be an explosion of entirely new, never before seen applications on the Mac. 3) Developers are going to make, and owners are going to buy, applications that duplicate the applications that they already have on their iOS devices. This is going to be true even of applications like Pandora that can be accessed from the web and don’t require applications. People are going to want to replicate the functionality of their iOS devices on their desktops. 4) An entirely new wave of developers is going to appear, as if from thin air. 5) People are going to start using their Macs in ways that no one has ever thought of using them before. 6) There are going to be games, games, games and more games. EDIT: 7) And another thing. The Mac App Store will help to sell a whole boatload of new Macs.

    We really need to get James Earl Jones to do the voice over for this to give it that little extra impact.  smile

    “Oh, people will come, Ray. People will most definitely come.”

    I AM James Earl Jones. Didn’t you know that? And you’ve used the wrong quote from the wrong movie:

    “Luke, if only you could FEEL the power of the dark side of the Mac App Store. And yes Luke, I may be your Father, but Steve Jobs is your Daddy!”

    Nope.  I’ve the right movie but I need to learn not to read your replies when I’m drinking my coffee.  It’s damn uncomfortable when it comes out your nose.  :(  Steve Jobs is your Daddy indeed!

    Relevant quote:

    “They’ll pass over the money without even thinking about it: for it is money they have and peace they lack.”

    Lord knows there is no peace in that PC World.

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    I don’t mind being wrong…,I just hate being wrong so FAST!

         
  • Posted: 03 January 2011 01:58 AM #36

    BillH - 03 January 2011 05:47 AM

    ...I need to learn not to read your replies when I’m drinking my coffee.  It’s damn uncomfortable when it comes out your nose.  :(  Steve Jobs is your Daddy indeed!

    Oh my God, I laughed myself silly when I read that.  LOL I consider that one of the greatest compliments I’ve ever received. If I can’t make you guys think, at least I can, on occasion, make you laugh.

         
  • Posted: 03 January 2011 03:57 AM #37

    FalKirk - 03 January 2011 02:48 AM
    MacGuffin - 02 January 2011 07:51 PM
    FalKirk - 01 January 2011 10:27 PM

    I predict that when Apple reports earnings on the 18th of January, they will report massive numbers coming out of the Mac App Store which opened only 12 days earlier on the 6th of January.

    I do of course feel the Mac App Store will be successful, however I’m not quite sure it will be such the tidal wave that you are expecting initially. After all, practically everything it will be offering is already out there for purchase today, so it’s not a direct parallel to when the iPhone App Store opened, which was of course the first day ever that you could get your hands on any of the software (in non-Safari form) and expand your hardware’s capability. I doubt that people have been holding off on their Mac software purchases for the past few months just so that they could buy them from Apple instead of the developer.

    The Mac Operating System was created in 1984, some twenty-six years ago. The iOS App store was created in June 2008, some two and a half years ago. The Mac probably has had, in its entire history, less than 100,000 viable applications. The App store has, in its brief history, had 300,000 apps and counting. Mac owners probably buy less than 20 applications throughout the life of their machine. iOS owners often buy 50 applications the first week that they own their device, with many devices holding literarily hundreds of applications. The Mac applications one owns may be few, but they can run one hundreds, or even thousands of dollars. Many of the iOS applications are free, but few begrudge spending 20, 40 or 50 dollars to fill their devices with Apps. I bought my current MacBook in 2006 and I can’t recall buying a single third party application for it. I bought my daughter an iPod Touch for Christmas and it is chock full of applications that I downloaded for her before Christmas and it is becoming ever fuller each day with applications that she’s downloaded since.

    Here’s what’s going to happen. 1) A slew of free and lower priced applications are going to make their appearance. 2) There is going to be an explosion of entirely new, never before seen applications on the Mac. 3) Developers are going to make, and owners are going to buy, applications that duplicate the applications that they already have on their iOS devices. This is going to be true even of applications like Pandora that can be accessed from the web and don’t require applications. People are going to want to replicate the functionality of their iOS devices on their desktops. 4) An entirely new wave of developers is going to appear, as if from thin air. 5) People are going to start using their Macs in ways that no one has ever thought of using them before. 6) There are going to be games, games, games and more games. EDIT: 7) And another thing. The Mac App Store will help to sell a whole boatload of new Macs.

    As you can tell, I’m all in on this. We will start to feel the impact of the Mac App Store within six months and within a year, everybody will acknowledge that Apple has, once again, revolutionized computing.

    Of course, I could be wrong about all of this. But I’m not.

    Thanks for the reasoned response, Fal. It’s a rare day indeed that I am a doubting Thomas for anything Apple-related, but I have some rebuttals:

    1) There was no barrier to entry before for all these developers you say are poised to come out of the woodwork. Whereas I agree that the Mac App Store will increase the visibility for some since everything will be under one roof for the consumer, it’s not like if someone had a worthwhile product before now that it would go unnoticed. And any gain in visibility to the consumer would presumably be somewhat offset by the (by your theory, increased) presence of comparable apps side-by-side.

    2) Where did you get that number of 50 iOS app purchases in the first week per iOS hardware buyer? And are you sure this figure doesn’t include *free* apps and is merely “downloads?” Because I find it very hard to believe. I am a fairly hardcore iOS device user and I doubt that even I have bought 50 paid apps…IN THREE YEARS! I realize most play a lot more games than I do, but still that would not account for such a huge disparity.

    3) This is a statement the likes of which many people have found themselves eating crow, but I can’t see the Mac App Store bringing about a mass proliferation of “entirely new, never before seen applications on the Mac.” Where have all these untapped ideas been for the past two decades? Or why have they at least not been written for PC and been so needed/wanted that they were brought over to the Mac platform? I don’t want to sound like the infamous patent office chief in the 19th century who shut the place down, stating everything worth inventing had already been invented ? however, I do think that everything worth inventing by January 6, 2011 has already been invented.

    4) How does the Mac App Store help sell Macs? Again, this store is not analogous to the iPhone App Store in that there has always been an outlet for Mac software. Who is going to look at an iMac in a new light saying, “It is so awesome that I can buy my software straight from Apple ? now I totally need this iMac that I didn’t think I needed before!”

    As previously stated, I very much hope you are 100% right and I am branded a worrying ninny. Not that I’m worried at all. But the jury’s still out on ninny.

    MacGuffin

         
  • Posted: 03 January 2011 08:12 AM #38

    MacGuffin,

    I think you are seeing this the wrong way. As if the Mac App store was a marketing tool to sell Macs, and if Apple offered Windows Apps too, it would sell PC’s. That’s not it.

    The iPad and its App store show how the world can be organised, and it’s a much better way for most people. A Mac App store can deliver the same safe yet rich environment on the content creation platform: Mac. It’s just the way the world has to be, and it will grow inexorably.

    I have a wonderful App called Aquaruler. It’s very simple, providing floating rulers of various sorts over the top of whatever’s on screen. It’s incredibly useful for digital content creators of all sorts. But the poor developer simply couldn’t maintain his own whole web site, business process etc with the app so easy to rip off. So he ended up just giving it away and washing his hands of marketing, updating etc. With a Mac App store, the original price could have been one tenth, he could have concentrated on what he was interested in and good at, and the app could be on almost every web designer, graphic artist and photographer’s Mac.

         
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    Posted: 03 January 2011 10:12 AM #39

    Intel provides the first clues of what to expect in the new MacBook line with the release of Sandy Bridge for Mobile via Anandtech

    Today, Intel takes the wraps off of Mobile Sandy Bridge and I can finally talk specifics. Notebooks have always been substantially slower than desktops, and prices for a set level of performance have been higher; that?s not going to change with the SNB launch, but the gap just got a lot narrower for a lot of users. The key ingredients consist of higher core clocks with substantially higher Turbo modes, an integrated graphics chip that more than doubles the previous generation (also with aggressive Turbo modes), and some additional architectural sauce to liven things up.

    One final item to quickly cover is synthetic graphics performance, courtesy of 3DMark. Sandy Bridge places in the middle of the pack, and obviously desktop solutions are far out of reach for the time being, but according to 3DMark we could see performance actually surpass some of the entry-level GPUs. Maybe 3DMark just has heavy optimizations from Intel?then again, maybe they actually do have a GPU that can compete.

    Again, Sandy Bridge delivers playable performance in every single title at 768p and ?Low? detail settings. What?s more, it actually surpasses the GeForce 320M in Apple?s MacBook Pro 13 in five out of six games (the exception being STALKER).


    Looks like the Nvidia 320M will finally be replaced with Intel’s IGP and hopefully lower the entry level cost for Apple systems which don’t rely on a dedicated GPU.

         
  • Posted: 03 January 2011 01:21 PM #40

    MacGuffin - 03 January 2011 07:57 AM

    1) There was no barrier to entry before for all these developers you say are poised to come out of the woodwork.

    I don’t agree with that. In fact, I would say the opposite was true. Today, developers have to do it all themselves. The Mac App Store relieves developers of many of their administrative burdens for a very reasonable fee.

    MacGuffin - 03 January 2011 07:57 AM

    Whereas I agree that the Mac App Store will increase the visibility for some since everything will be under one roof for the consumer, it’s not like if someone had a worthwhile product before now that it would go unnoticed.

    I have to disagree. I think most current Mac developers go completely unnoticed. My proof is anecdotal. I listen to dozens of Apple podcasts and I’m an avid reader of all things Apple. But I still know almost nothing about products available for the Mac and I buy even less. Just one man’s story. But I think it is a very telling story.

    MacGuffin - 03 January 2011 07:57 AM

    2) Where did you get that number of 50 iOS app purchases in the first week per iOS hardware buyer? And are you sure this figure doesn’t include *free* apps and is merely “downloads?” Because I find it very hard to believe. I am a fairly hardcore iOS device user and I doubt that even I have bought 50 paid apps…IN THREE YEARS! I realize most play a lot more games than I do, but still that would not account for such a huge disparity.

    First, I just guesstimated the “50” number for the sake of advancing the conversation. Second, I went back and re-read my original statement. I had meant to say that that people were downloading 50 free and paid applications. Suggesting that people paid for 50 Apps was totally my bad and totally unintentional on my part.

    MacGuffin - 03 January 2011 07:57 AM

    3) This is a statement the likes of which many people have found themselves eating crow, but I can’t see the Mac App Store bringing about a mass proliferation of “entirely new, never before seen applications on the Mac.” Where have all these untapped ideas been for the past two decades?

    In 2006, Gartner was predicting that Microsoft would overcome Symbian in the mobile space, in part because they were becoming the platform of choice for developers. As proof, they cited the 19,000 applications available for Win CE. Today, the App Store accepts 1,000 new Apps a day and, in two and a half years, the App Store has accumulated over 300,000 Apps. Where were all those untapped Apps in the decade before Apple introduced the App store?

    The App Store gives us a pretty clear example of the kind of creativity that can occur when economic “friction” is reduced. Just go through the App Store. How many of those apps would have existed if the developer had had to pay for their own web site, marketing and credit card costs?

    When the price of something drops, the number of uses for that something increases. (Marginal utility?) When calculators dropped from $100 to $1.00 everybody found a use for them. In some Arab nations, water is precious. The idea of opening a car wash would be ludicrous. But in the U.S., water is cheap and it is used in a wide variety of creative ways.

    Similarly, fart apps and flash light apps and tip calculator apps exist because they can. These types of Apps may all seem wasteful, but the same economic principals also drive developers to create dozens of powerful task manager apps, photo manipulation apps, Twitter client apps, etc, etc, etc.

    No, I’m not worried about this prediction at all. If both the cost of distributing Applications is reduced and the cost of purchasing Applications is reduced, there will be an explosion of new Apps that were impractical and unthinkable in the previous economic environment.

    MacGuffin - 03 January 2011 07:57 AM

    4) How does the Mac App Store help sell Macs? Again, this store is not analogous to the iPhone App Store in that there has always been an outlet for Mac software. Who is going to look at an iMac in a new light saying, “It is so awesome that I can buy my software straight from Apple ? now I totally need this iMac that I didn’t think I needed before!”

    This is not about buying your software from Apple. It’s about convenience, price, and availability. Would you be more likely to buy a new car if the dealership agreed to come to your home each day in order to fill your tank with gas, clean your car, and check your engine, all for about a tenth of what you were currently paying for those services? Similarly, would you be more likely to buy a new computer if you knew that for a few dollars and for less than you’d pay elsewhere, you’d be able to instantly and painlessly download the latest and greatest productivity software, utilities and games?

    MacGuffin - 03 January 2011 07:57 AM

    As previously stated, I very much hope you are 100% right and I am branded a worrying ninny. Not that I’m worried at all. But the jury’s still out on ninny.

    I have a habit of thinking out loud, which can be quite dangerous. I like these kinds of discussions. Many of your comments were spot on. I don’t see them as adversarial, I see them as an opportunity to hone my thoughts. Keep on nagging me. It keeps me honest and it helps me think.

         
  • Posted: 03 January 2011 02:24 PM #41

    Gene Munster made many Apple predictions, most of them quite reasonable, whcih can be found here. However, he continues to maintain his belief in his oft-predicted Apple TV.

    Looking ahead, Munster maintains his long-held view that Apple will eventually enter the TV market, ?as an all-in-one Apple television could move the needle when connected TVs proliferate.? He also expects the company to offer a variety of new cloud-based computing services.

    I just don’t get this. Apple gets everything it wants on a TV screen with Apple TV, a $99 unit that is device agnostic. Why would Apple want to enter a field with no margins in order to create a device that is, essentially, already available to all TV’s?

    The problem with TVs today is their inability to obtain inexpensive and ubiquitous content. What problem would an all-in-one Apple TV solve?

    Thoughts?

         
  • Posted: 03 January 2011 04:30 PM #42

    I don’t think Apple gets everything it wants with Apple TV. Apple seems to want to be involved in all aspects of your media consumption experience, and television is the next logical place to go. I would guess currently that 90%+ of this experience is watching live or recorded television from your cable provider, with the rest being Netflix and BDs/DVDs. Apple doesn’t need to create connected TVs to become a larger part of the TV experience. Combining Apple TV and the set top box into one device would allow for one easy to use box to watch TV, use TV apps, and connect to iOS devices. IMO, this is the only way that Apple TV will sell in unit numbers that compare to their other product lines. What I like the best about this idea is that consumers would not need to buy the boxes directly, just lease them from cable operators.


    On a different note: 1080p Apple TV is one upgrade that needs to happen in the next refresh.

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    Posted: 03 January 2011 06:33 PM #43

    FalKirk - 03 January 2011 06:24 PM

    Gene Munster made many Apple predictions, most of them quite reasonable, whcih can be found here. However, he continues to maintain his belief in his oft-predicted Apple TV.

    Looking ahead, Munster maintains his long-held view that Apple will eventually enter the TV market, ?as an all-in-one Apple television could move the needle when connected TVs proliferate.? He also expects the company to offer a variety of new cloud-based computing services.

    I just don’t get this. Apple gets everything it wants on a TV screen with Apple TV, a $99 unit that is device agnostic. Why would Apple want to enter a field with no margins in order to create a device that is, essentially, already available to all TV’s?

    The problem with TVs today is their inability to obtain inexpensive and ubiquitous content. What problem would an all-in-one Apple TV solve?

    Thoughts?

    I think you brought up the reason in your post why apple may enter - you say its a no margin business, but apple could release a premium end panel including apple TV functionality, with good quality components and beautiful industrial design, and at least 10% of the TV buying market would be happy to pay a premium for the apple product - thereby giving apple a very healthy margin.

    Im sure apple would get just as high a margin from TVs selling for $999, $1499, $1999 as they currently do for their macbooks at the same pricepoints (if not more)

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    - Pro: Apple HDTV, iPhone Air, Stock split, Consumer robotics

         
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    Posted: 03 January 2011 06:46 PM #44

    I just have to disagree with this whole idea of Apple entering into the TV business. I just don’t see it happening. I was going to write why, but I just don’t see the use in debating this. Heck, Apple even stopped producing their 30 displays.  rolleyes

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  • Posted: 03 January 2011 07:57 PM #45

    iOSWeekly - 03 January 2011 10:33 PM

    I think you brought up the reason in your post why apple may enter - you say its a no margin business, but apple could release a premium end panel including apple TV functionality, with good quality components and beautiful industrial design, and at least 10% of the TV buying market would be happy to pay a premium for the apple product - thereby giving apple a very healthy margin.

    Im sure apple would get just as high a margin from TVs selling for $999, $1499, $1999 as they currently do for their macbooks at the same pricepoints (if not more)

    Someone once told me that in the military they have a saying: “If you find yourself in a fair fight…

    ...you haven’t planned properly.”

    Well, I don’t think Apple much likes fair fights or fair competition. They like to go into a market and re-invent it with a product that gives them an unfair advantage. If Apple went into the TV business, they’d just be selling a premium service. Not enough of an edge to justify their efforts, in my opinion.