“Other” stocks

  • Posted: 08 February 2011 11:29 PM #46

    mbeauch - 09 February 2011 01:27 AM

    Platon, I would be hunting down the person who told you that you had to pay taxes now on dividends in your 401k. The drawback is that you will have to pay taxes on those dividends at the rate of your withdrawal. Since that rate now stands at 15%, chances are you will pay a higher tax rate. The plus is that you can reinvest those dividends tax free for a while.

    mbeauch, these MLPs are quirky with taxes especially once you sell. Here is some info that helped confuse me.

    “Tax Issues
    MLPs offer potential tax advantages because most of their distributions are classified as a return of investment instead of income. You don?t pay taxes on that portion until you sell. However, when you do sell, you?ll be taxed at the ordinary income rate, not as capital gains.

    On the downside, MLPs require the use of special forms at tax time, which some investors consider too complicated. Also, holding MLPs in tax-sheltered accounts such as IRAs could incur penalties if you collect distributions totaling more than $1,000 annually. If that?s your situation, consult a tax advisor before investing.”

         
  • Posted: 08 February 2011 11:32 PM #47

    This is another old argument about how these MLPs pay such large divs.

    http://www.fool.com/investing/dividends-income/2011/02/07/beware-of-oil-and-gas-dividends.aspx

         
  • Posted: 09 February 2011 12:35 AM #48

    Platon - 09 February 2011 12:51 AM

    Mbeauch I owned evep as well as mmp and sold way to soon. I had them in a 401k and was told that the divs were taxable even in a 401 so I baled. Tax accountant said not so,so I still am unclear. I believe mmp has done a little better than evep but they are both outstanding.
    [...]

    I urge anyone looking into oil/gas limited partnerships to talk to their accountant first.  In some cases you may end up being liable for paying taxes in several states in addition to the state in which you live.  While the dollar cost of these may not be too large, the hassle involved is not for everyone.

    Regarding the 401 question it is my understanding that dividends are partially or all taxable, but are deferred (key word).  Ask you accountant.

    For those who do like these, despite the tax issues, my favorite is HGT.

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 09 February 2011 12:12 PM #49

    DECK is getting love again..  technically it has been getting love for over a week.

    I think it at least runs up into the old high of 87.88… which is why I just bought Feb 80’s.. 

    The 50 day moving average was 79.33 on the 4th.  This coincided with the current run-up..  now that the average has caught up..  I think this stock moves breaks out. 

    It seems to me that the clothing/apparel hustles are getting the most juice..

    I am currently long LULU, DECK, NKE (85/90 spread), APPL (320/325), and RVBD (37/41)

    everything is feb except the appl trade is march

    EDIT: i’m dumping my RVBD spreads tomorrow..  I don’t mine kicking mine’s to the curb when they don’t ‘act right’..  I look at ‘em and say…  “you GOTS ta go..”

    [ Edited: 09 February 2011 09:19 PM by blaze biscuits ]      
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    Posted: 09 February 2011 07:48 PM #50

    blaze biscuits - 09 February 2011 04:12 PM

    ... AAPL (320/325) ...  the AAPL trade is march

    Very conservative :evil:, how to make big $ :groucho:.

    Signature

    Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.  - Steve Jobs

         
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    Posted: 09 February 2011 08:09 PM #51

    Bill Bonner
    Why the Unemployed Lose Faith in the System

    Reckoning from Baltimore, Maryland…

    Dow plus 71 yesterday. Gold plus $15.

    Everything seems okay, doesn’t it? Good, then let’s look deeper…at the story behind the story…

    As we’ve been saying, elites look out for themselves. But why not? Everyone looks out for Numero Uno. No? Isn’t that what you’d expect?

    Every organization has some people in control of it. Government is no exception. Often, the people with real control are not those who appear to have the reigns of power. Sometimes, the real power is hidden…behind the scenes…

    Some of the most remarkable and successful societies have been ruled by slaves. No kidding. The Mamluks in Egypt and the Janissaries in the Ottoman Empire. They were captured or bought in Europe. The boys - usually Christian - were taken to special training camps. There, they were converted to Islam and learned the arts of war and administration. They became soldiers. Or bureaucrats. Generals. Governors. They ran things on a day-to-day basis…for the elite powers behind them.

    Of course, sometimes, like Rome’s barbarian troops, they turned on their masters and took over completely… Then, the master became the slave…

    But that is a long, long story. Even in a complex, modern democracy the government acts first and foremost on behalf of the groups that control it.

    How? Part bribery. Party larceny. They take from some. They give to others. They keep a lot for themselves.

    So, it was not at all surprising that in the crisis of ‘07-‘09 the feds immediately bailed out the banks. That was an act of larceny. The big banks have power. They used the power to enrich themselves. Simple, huh?

    This treachery cost the nation trillions of dollars, but only one out of a 1,000 people really understands what is going on. The other 999 think the feds “saved the economy.” They think Ben Bernanke is a hero, not a scoundrel.

    In a representative democracy, powerful elites have to pretend to act for the good of the “people.” So, they pretend that bailouts to Wall Street are necessary. And they provide handouts to the poor, too. Food stamps, for example. People who get food stamps have little real power. But they vote. Food stamps are a cheap way to bribe the electorate.

    And as more and more people are caught up in the system - as either knave, enabler, or accomplice - the more the system becomes zombified. There are just fewer and fewer people left who are actually producing wealth. The system itself then begins to creak and crumble…and finally falls apart.

    We’re not fool enough to think that this is what really happens. It’s just what you’d call an “artist’s conception.” It’s an idealized, simplified theory about the way things work.

    Real life is always much, much more nuanced…complicated…and infinitely messy.

    Still, it gives us a way of understanding, imperfectly, the drift of things…

    For example…the Fed’s quantitative easing and the Obama administration’s stimulus program.

    “The US stimulus robbed our grandchildren,” writes Darrell Issa, US congressman, in The Financial Times.

    We were surprised. We didn’t think there was anyone in congress - except for Ron Paul - who had any idea of what was going on. Mr. Issa seems to be another exception.

    He explains that the results from the 4th quarter are now in. They show that the stimulus program “has woefully failed to reach each of its self-imposed targets.”

    Employment is 6.8 million short. And fourth quarter GDP is $400 billion less than promised.

    “Some 47 out of 50 US states…have lost jobs since the stimulus was passed,” he reports.

    And most of the jobs that were created were zombie jobs - working in the public sector.

    In other words, the feds spent $814 billion. We got nothing much for it. But the bill will be handed to future generations - who are guilty of neither larceny nor complicity.

    How does the next generation feel about it?

    Signature

    “Even in the worst of times, someone turns a profit. . ” —#162 Ferengi: Rules of Acquisition

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 09 February 2011 09:16 PM #52

    Mace - 09 February 2011 11:48 PM
    blaze biscuits - 09 February 2011 04:12 PM

    ... AAPL (320/325) ...  the AAPL trade is march

    Very conservative :evil:, how to make big $ :groucho:.

    51.5% return in 2 months is not bad..

    compound and annualize it..  it sits nice

    *- my goal was to buy back the 325 calls when more sh*** news came out about Jobs..  that did not happen though..  not yet.  and it may never happen..  in fact there might be just the opposite.

    either way…  I’ll take that 51.5%.  that’s not conservative really.  It’s conservative compared to what you COULD make (and with more risk)..  but it’s not a 10% annual gain.

         
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    Posted: 09 February 2011 09:22 PM #53

    blaze biscuits - 10 February 2011 01:16 AM
    Mace - 09 February 2011 11:48 PM
    blaze biscuits - 09 February 2011 04:12 PM

    ... AAPL (320/325) ...  the AAPL trade is march

    Very conservative :evil:, how to make big $ :groucho:.

    51.5% return in 2 months is not bad..

    compound and annualize it..  it sits nice

    *- my goal was to buy back the 325 calls when more sh*** news came out about Jobs..  that did not happen though..  not yet.  and it may never happen..  in fact there might be just the opposite.

    either way…  I’ll take that 51.5%.  that’s not conservative really.  It’s conservative compared to what you COULD make (and with more risk)..  but it’s not a 10% annual gain.

    For AAPL options, we aim for 1000% :bugeyed:  annual gain :apple:.  Two recent cases, both mbeauch and Gregg Thurman bought calls (Jan12 $480), expecting to make a killing when AAPL hits $590 in Jan 12.  That would be 2000% gain.

    Signature

    Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.  - Steve Jobs

         
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    Posted: 09 February 2011 09:28 PM #54

    Mace - 10 February 2011 01:22 AM

    Two recent cases, both mbeauch and Gregg Thurman bought calls (Jan12 $480), expecting to make a killing when AAPL hits $590 in Jan 12.  That would be 2000% gain.

    do you want a cookie?

    or do you want me to just nominate you for the Trader’s Hall of Fame?

    51.5% is a chump change return Mace..  but one that I figured I would grab right quick while I waited for something else better to come up.

    I can sell them right now for about a 35%-40% return.


    EDIT:  if you bought 10K worth of my spreads, which take 2 months to ‘cook’..  and you took those profits (my measily 51.5%) and then rolled them into new 2 month spreads for another measily 51.5%..  do you know what your 10K worth of spreads would be in a year?

    that 10K would be worth $ -120,913.78

    that is a 1,200 percent return..  and that was ALL in the money, well under the current share price..

    Here’s a compounding calculator if you need help with that stuff:  http://www.calculatorsoup.com/calculators/financial/future-value.php

    [ Edited: 09 February 2011 09:34 PM by blaze biscuits ]      
  • Avatar

    Posted: 10 February 2011 01:00 AM #55

    CRUS has had quite a run in the last 12 months.  With their chips in most of apple’s products, does anybody here believe that they have more room to move up in the next 12 months?

    TTM PE is 18.11 - doesn’t appear to be overvalued.  Their last quarter looked pretty good.  It seems that people should be taking profits, but are holding on.

    It’s gone from 6 bucks to 24 bucks in roughly 13 months…

    Signature

    The only way to change the perception, is to change the reality.

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 10 February 2011 01:11 AM #56

    TanToday - 10 February 2011 12:09 AM

    Bill Bonner
    Why the Unemployed Lose Faith in the System

    Reckoning from Baltimore, Maryland…

    Dow plus 71 yesterday. Gold plus $15.

    Everything seems okay, doesn’t it? Good, then let’s look deeper…at the story behind the story…

    As we’ve been saying, elites look out for themselves. But why not? Everyone looks out for Numero Uno. No? Isn’t that what you’d expect?

    Every organization has some people in control of it. Government is no exception. Often, the people with real control are not those who appear to have the reigns of power. Sometimes, the real power is hidden…behind the scenes…

    Some of the most remarkable and successful societies have been ruled by slaves. No kidding. The Mamluks in Egypt and the Janissaries in the Ottoman Empire. They were captured or bought in Europe. The boys - usually Christian - were taken to special training camps. There, they were converted to Islam and learned the arts of war and administration. They became soldiers. Or bureaucrats. Generals. Governors. They ran things on a day-to-day basis…for the elite powers behind them.

    Of course, sometimes, like Rome’s barbarian troops, they turned on their masters and took over completely… Then, the master became the slave…

    But that is a long, long story. Even in a complex, modern democracy the government acts first and foremost on behalf of the groups that control it.

    How? Part bribery. Party larceny. They take from some. They give to others. They keep a lot for themselves.

    So, it was not at all surprising that in the crisis of ‘07-‘09 the feds immediately bailed out the banks. That was an act of larceny. The big banks have power. They used the power to enrich themselves. Simple, huh?

    This treachery cost the nation trillions of dollars, but only one out of a 1,000 people really understands what is going on. The other 999 think the feds “saved the economy.” They think Ben Bernanke is a hero, not a scoundrel.

    In a representative democracy, powerful elites have to pretend to act for the good of the “people.” So, they pretend that bailouts to Wall Street are necessary. And they provide handouts to the poor, too. Food stamps, for example. People who get food stamps have little real power. But they vote. Food stamps are a cheap way to bribe the electorate.

    And as more and more people are caught up in the system - as either knave, enabler, or accomplice - the more the system becomes zombified. There are just fewer and fewer people left who are actually producing wealth. The system itself then begins to creak and crumble…and finally falls apart.

    We’re not fool enough to think that this is what really happens. It’s just what you’d call an “artist’s conception.” It’s an idealized, simplified theory about the way things work.

    Real life is always much, much more nuanced…complicated…and infinitely messy.

    Still, it gives us a way of understanding, imperfectly, the drift of things…

    For example…the Fed’s quantitative easing and the Obama administration’s stimulus program.

    “The US stimulus robbed our grandchildren,” writes Darrell Issa, US congressman, in The Financial Times.

    We were surprised. We didn’t think there was anyone in congress - except for Ron Paul - who had any idea of what was going on. Mr. Issa seems to be another exception.

    He explains that the results from the 4th quarter are now in. They show that the stimulus program “has woefully failed to reach each of its self-imposed targets.”

    Employment is 6.8 million short. And fourth quarter GDP is $400 billion less than promised.

    “Some 47 out of 50 US states…have lost jobs since the stimulus was passed,” he reports.

    And most of the jobs that were created were zombie jobs - working in the public sector.

    In other words, the feds spent $814 billion. We got nothing much for it. But the bill will be handed to future generations - who are guilty of neither larceny nor complicity.

    How does the next generation feel about it?

    Thanks Tan - I enjoyed reading this.. I have another interesting writer to follow..

    Signature

    The only way to change the perception, is to change the reality.

         
  • Posted: 10 February 2011 01:18 AM #57

    blaze biscuits - 10 February 2011 01:28 AM
    Mace - 10 February 2011 01:22 AM

    Two recent cases, both mbeauch and Gregg Thurman bought calls (Jan12 $480), expecting to make a killing when AAPL hits $590 in Jan 12.  That would be 2000% gain.

    do you want a cookie?

    or do you want me to just nominate you for the Trader’s Hall of Fame?

    51.5% is a chump change return Mace..  but one that I figured I would grab right quick while I waited for something else better to come up.

    I can sell them right now for about a 35%-40% return.


    EDIT:  if you bought 10K worth of my spreads, which take 2 months to ‘cook’..  and you took those profits (my measily 51.5%) and then rolled them into new 2 month spreads for another measily 51.5%..  do you know what your 10K worth of spreads would be in a year?

    that 10K would be worth $ -120,913.78

    that is a 1,200 percent return..  and that was ALL in the money, well under the current share price..

    Here’s a compounding calculator if you need help with that stuff:  http://www.calculatorsoup.com/calculators/financial/future-value.php

    Please keep in mind that English is not the native language of everyone on this board.  Sometimes comments seem curt, when they are actually just efficient.

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 10 February 2011 01:36 AM #58

    Dennyhil - 10 February 2011 05:00 AM

    It’s gone from 6 bucks to 24 bucks in roughly 13 months…

     

    that’s a great move on stock alone..  a leveraged ride on that would be ‘tits’..  as my aunt says

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 10 February 2011 01:39 AM #59

    capablanca - 10 February 2011 05:18 AM

    Please keep in mind that English is not the native language of everyone on this board.  Sometimes comments seem curt, when they are actually just efficient.

    You are right..  I guess the ‘we like to aim for..” just irritated me.  I’m not going to jump off a bridge if ‘we’ are doing it..

    and secondly..  the 51.5% return IS over 1000% annualized.. so that irritated me too..

    lol.  i guess i’m just an irratable guy nowadays..  at least today.  I think fatty (me) needs to exercise more.

    *** - your point is well taken though, all joking aside

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 10 February 2011 12:09 PM #60

    I am out of LULU & RVBD…  still in DECK & NKE.

    I think LULU still rolls up in the next 2-3 weeks..  and I will get back in on a pullback.

    I had too much crap on the table at once and took some companies off.  I was getting ahead of myself with my new technical analysis toys..