How serious is Apple about Enterprise?

  • Posted: 22 February 2012 01:24 PM #16

    CdnPhoto - 22 February 2012 02:29 PM

    SAP from what I’ve read, is a very big Apple/iOS shop.

    And Apple is a very big SAP shop . . .

         
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    Posted: 22 February 2012 02:39 PM #17

    CdnPhoto - 22 February 2012 02:29 PM
    sleepygeek - 22 February 2012 02:09 PM

    Idea: RIM slowly fades away. SAP takes over RIM server side assets and enterprise customer base, giving enterprise customers a viable Blackberry roadmap with choice of handset/tablet platforms going forward (including Android, IOS and WinMO.

    SAP from what I’ve read, is a very big Apple/iOS shop.

    Interview with SAP CIO at CES on iPad/iPhone deployment

         
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    Posted: 22 February 2012 10:32 PM #18

    “Good” just made IT data security a little easier.

    http://www.cultofmac.com/148033/securing-business-data-on-the-iphone-and-ipad-just-got-easier-thanks-to-good/

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    Tim Cook: iPad is 91% of all tablet web traffic. I don’t know what these other tablets are doing.

         
  • Posted: 23 February 2012 05:17 AM #19

    So maybe the thread could be titled

    How serious is enterprise about Apple?

         
  • Posted: 23 February 2012 08:38 AM #20

    danthemason - 23 February 2012 09:17 AM

    So maybe the thread could be titled

    How serious is enterprise about Apple?

    Agree. Any traction Apple has been getting of late from enterprises is because they have come to Apple, not the other way.  Enterprise IT departments of the ‘90s are thankfully dying dinosaurs.

    A generation of students whose picture you saw using Apple laptops on college campuses during the past decade want nothing to do with Windows, PCs, cavalier IT managers, and crappy, kludgy devices like Blackberry garbage.  Its now as much as an HR and recruitment issue as IT issue.

    Its over.

         
  • Posted: 23 February 2012 09:26 AM #21

    Mike in Helsinki - 23 February 2012 12:38 PM
    danthemason - 23 February 2012 09:17 AM

    So maybe the thread could be titled

    How serious is enterprise about Apple?

    Agree. Any traction Apple has been getting of late from enterprises is because they have come to Apple, not the other way.  Enterprise IT departments of the ‘90s are thankfully dying dinosaurs.

    A generation of students whose picture you saw using Apple laptops on college campuses during the past decade want nothing to do with Windows, PCs, cavalier IT managers, and crappy, kludgy devices like Blackberry garbage.  Its now as much as an HR and recruitment issue as IT issue.

    Its over.

    That generation of students is still around 10% of total. Further, they’re mostly not in positions to make decisions yet. That critical point is further down the line.

         
  • Posted: 23 February 2012 04:01 PM #22

    mstefa - 23 February 2012 01:26 PM
    Mike in Helsinki - 23 February 2012 12:38 PM
    danthemason - 23 February 2012 09:17 AM

    So maybe the thread could be titled

    How serious is enterprise about Apple?

    Agree. Any traction Apple has been getting of late from enterprises is because they have come to Apple, not the other way.  Enterprise IT departments of the ‘90s are thankfully dying dinosaurs.

    A generation of students whose picture you saw using Apple laptops on college campuses during the past decade want nothing to do with Windows, PCs, cavalier IT managers, and crappy, kludgy devices like Blackberry garbage.  Its now as much as an HR and recruitment issue as IT issue.

    Its over.

    That generation of students is still around 10% of total. Further, they’re mostly not in positions to make decisions yet. That critical point is further down the line.

    It’s more about recruiting than it’s about who makes the infrastructure decisions.  If you are among the top percentile companies and you want to recruit the best candidates one would be well advised to show that your thinking and processes are up to date.  Once you green light the new hires to byo or supply them with their tools of choice it’s nigh impossible to deny that same privilege to the rest of the work force. Once the big boys tip the rest of the world will be quick to follow.  I agree with Mike in Helsinki.  It’s over.  Of course, it will take time to play out.

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  • Posted: 12 April 2012 12:24 AM #23

    So last week, I went on my very first joint sales call with members of the Apple Enterpise team.  That went so well, that we got introduced to additional members of their Enterprise team.  They are doing this because we are getting close to releasing an iOS solution that will be unique in their overall ecosystem.  It has the potential to drive iOS adoption in areas of the Enterprise where not much action has happened so far.

    Talking with these guys provides an interesting perspective.  They can get pretty much anyone they call, no matter high up to return their calls.  As we all know, Apple is now seeing tremendous success in the Enterprise.  It is not even accurate to refer to what the Enterprise team does as “sales”.

    I had wondered if I would find complacency, given how easy success is coming to them.  Nope.  They are already planning for the day, when someone else comes up with the next hot device. The strategy now is to drive apps into all of those Enterprise wins.  Without those apps, they feel that their stickiness is at risk.  Their paranoia is very encouraging as an Apple shareholder.  It is also encouraging as an iOS developer, since their interest has led to us getting help with Apple Developer Relations, together with account access that we could never get otherwise, since we are so small.

    Apple still has hunger, and scrappiness from what I am seeing.

         
  • Posted: 12 April 2012 01:58 AM #24

    Maybe I need to start reading this thread from the beginning, but how much of the enterprise potential presumes running the Windows OS?  Most enterprise-worthy software is Windoze, with the exception graphics design concerns in which Apple already has a presence.

    In my firm, I am running all Apple hardware but it requires Windows 7, using Parallels.  It works quite well, actually.  But I would prefer running enterprise apps running natively on OSX.  I don’t see evidence this will change anytime soon. 

    A minor irritant:  I wish Apple would make its own 10 key for the portables.  Using the aftermarket ones is a letdown and the software “solution” that utilize the trackpad blow.

         
  • Posted: 12 April 2012 10:07 AM #25

    Mercel - 12 April 2012 04:58 AM

    Maybe I need to start reading this thread from the beginning, but how much of the enterprise potential presumes running the Windows OS?  Most enterprise-worthy software is Windoze, with the exception graphics design concerns in which Apple already has a presence.

    In my firm, I am running all Apple hardware but it requires Windows 7, using Parallels.  It works quite well, actually.  But I would prefer running enterprise apps running natively on OSX.  I don’t see evidence this will change anytime soon. 

    A minor irritant:  I wish Apple would make its own 10 key for the portables.  Using the aftermarket ones is a letdown and the software “solution” that utilize the trackpad blow.

    Many Enterprise apps are emerging that presume no PC anywhere.  These are mobility applications that impact the productivity of the mobile workforce.  Maybe there are PC’s back at Corporate, for part of the solution, but the battle is for the Mobile worker.  In our case, the iOS app completely interoperates with a PC app that we also sell.  We see very little push from the Enterprise for that app to be on OS X.  So I agree that the PC will be still king of the desktop in Enterprise for quite some time.  But that won’t stop the deployment of the iOS app, if we end up being successful.  I think there are lots of iOS opportunities in this category.