FCC Warns of Increase in One-Ring Robocalls

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The FCC is warning of an increase in one-ring robocalls. Scammers call you once, the hope you’ll be curious enough to call back.

A long-running hustle that is reportedly seeing a resurgence involves a scammer calling someone and then hanging up after just a couple of seconds. The perpetrator hopes that curiosity will prompt the person to call back. But doing so will result in expensive per-minute charges, leaving the caller with an expensive bill if the scammer succeeds in keep them on the line for any length of time.

John Oliver Robocalls FCC to Protest Ineffective Rules

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John Oliver is robocalling FCC commissioners like Ajit Pai. He argues that the rules are ineffective at stopping them.

“Hi FCC, this is John from customer service,” Oliver’s recorded voice says on the call. “Congratulations, you’ve just won a chance to lower robocalls in America today… robocalls are incredibly annoying, and the person who can stop them is you! Talk to you again in 90 minutes—here’s some bagpipe music.”

AT&T Updates Smartphones With Misleading 5G Icon

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AT&T is so excited for the rollout of 5G that it’s updating smartphones a bit early, with a misleading 5G icon.

AT&T has updated three smartphones from Samsung and LG to make them show 5G connectivity logos, even though none of them are capable of connecting to 5G networks…That “E” in the “5G” logo is supposed to tip you off that this isn’t real 5G — just some marketing nonsense. But there’s no way of knowing that just from looking at the logo.

As it turns out, the government didn’t create or ratify 5G. Neither the FCC nor FTC are regulating what the term means, so technically AT&T is still within the law by doing this. Doesn’t make it right, but it shows how absurd the 5G situation is.

Net Neutrality Ends in US, Protective Legislation Stalls

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Net Neutrality faces Republican opposition

FCC chairman Ajit Pai’s dream of an internet unshackled from net neutrality regulations is coming true because as of now the Open Internet Order is no longer in effect, opening the door for internet service providers to control access to online content in the United States as they see fit.