iPad at schools?!

  • Posted: 02 February 2010 07:44 AM

    Hi People….
    Maybe it’s nothing or maybe it’s everything… I came to think of it:
    I dont know about the U.S but here in the Netherlands school/studybooks cost a fortune and get outdated quite fast. Every year the same old thing: get the damn things, try to sell them, buy new ones etc.

    IF you offer them on the iPad (with subscription?) it would be just perfect! Next to that you could make notes (homework?) on the iPad, tie it all together by cloudcomputing (Mobile me= Mobile study) and you have a whole new way of learning and communicating with teachers and schools!  For just 500-600 $/Euro you have a tool that will last the whole study and every year you renew your subscription to get new “books”....  imagine the possibilities!!!

    Just my thoughts….

    MacB, Kerkrade Netherlands.

         
  • Posted: 02 February 2010 08:05 AM #1

    There is already mucho interest:

    http://ipad4edu.com/

    This is a Q & A website for educators and is focused on iPad use in the classroom rather than textbooks.

         
  • Posted: 02 February 2010 08:13 AM #2

    RedInAustin - 02 February 2010 12:05 PM

    There is already mucho interest:

    http://ipad4edu.com/

    This is a Q & A website for educators and is focused on iPad use in the classroom rather than textbooks.

    Thanx…a great source for info!

         
  • Posted: 02 February 2010 12:22 PM #3

    The iPad is going to be huge in educational publishing. Basically it solves the publishers’ problem with used book sellers, who have been eating into their business for decades, and gives them a stable and popular platform to distribute DRM-ed digital textbooks. I fully expect a more formal announcement of Apple’s deals with higher ed publishers later this year, along with some kind of pilot program to use iPads as a textbook replacement on college campuses. (No insider info, just my guesswork.)

         
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    Posted: 02 February 2010 01:16 PM #4

    Nonsuch - 02 February 2010 04:22 PM

    The iPad is going to be huge in educational publishing. Basically it solves the publishers’ problem with used book sellers, who have been eating into their business for decades ...

    Bad news.  Students can no longer buy cheap second-hand books.  Hope that price of iBooks are set reasonably.  Otherwise, someone is going to come up with a method to transfer iBooks from one iPad to another without paying.  University has to come up with a way to manage this.

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    Posted: 02 February 2010 01:37 PM #5

    Universities can require authentication for updates/interactive tools to ward off piracy.
    ...or a courses ibook could be included in tuition fee.

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  • Posted: 02 February 2010 01:40 PM #6

    I am totally stoked about this iPad in education!!! I think here in Qu?bec Canada the school commissions are the ones well placed to negotiate and manage licences to textbooks and even copybook templates. This should save money for everyone in the school system and our forests to boot. I could see parents buying one for their children in elementary, then one in high-school and one for collage and beyond.
    The children of parents who can’t afford would either be donated, rent or lent a unit. The iPad is the device to finally bring our school systems into the 21st century. This will, save many a Childs back. My sons back-sack is the weight of an army grunt.

         
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    Posted: 02 February 2010 04:47 PM #7

    There is another aspect to this. A fair number of schools have their kids using a laptop computer. This is fine except that a laptop is open in the sense that stuff can be installed, removed, settings can be fiddled with. The kid can generally screw the system up and then “my laptop ate my homework”. The iPad on the other hand is much more restrictive. The Apps are more limited. I suspect that the settings that the end user can fiddle with are much more restrictive as well. The upshot could be less support cost to the school.

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    Posted: 02 February 2010 07:04 PM #8

    MacB - 02 February 2010 11:44 AM

    Hi People….
    Maybe it’s nothing or maybe it’s everything… I came to think of it:
    I dont know about the U.S but here in the Netherlands school/studybooks cost a fortune and get outdated quite fast. Every year the same old thing: get the damn things, try to sell them, buy new ones etc.

    IF you offer them on the iPad (with subscription?) it would be just perfect! Next to that you could make notes (homework?) on the iPad, tie it all together by cloudcomputing (Mobile me= Mobile study) and you have a whole new way of learning and communicating with teachers and schools!  For just 500-600 $/Euro you have a tool that will last the whole study and every year you renew your subscription to get new “books”....  imagine the possibilities!!!

    Just my thoughts….

    MacB, Kerkrade Netherlands.

    I like your idea, but from what I remember, the main problem with textbooks in US colleges were the publishers. The publishers would, every couple of years, issue new editions of populare textbooks, that differed very little from edition to edition. This made the second-hand book market very shallow, with little prospects for a student to find a willing buyer of his expensive textbooks: planned obsolescence in a very low tech field.

    The new medium, from paper to electronic, does not by itself imply a lower price for textbooks, but merely a lower cost of distribution What will lower the cost of textbooks is more choice, but Calculus and Analytical Geometry by T. Finney 7th edition (Addison Wesley) can not compete with Calculus and Analytical Geometry by T. Finney 8th edition (Addison Wesley). Good luck selling the 7th edition, when the requirement is the 8th edition. The other option is for colleges to group together and demand that publishers do not keep changing textbooks on them so often. After all, the principles of calculus or the plays of Shakespeare do not change from one year to another. Since this hasn’t occurred in the face rising costs and complaints, I do not see it happening just because the text is electronic. No, now the text can be changed even more often, with lower distribution costs.

    Students will again be screwed.

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    Posted: 02 February 2010 07:54 PM #9

    The Optimist

    The Optimist, ACU?s student-run newspaper, will be available on Apple?s new iPad device when it premiers in 60 days, making it the first collegiate student publication to take advantage of Apple?s latest technology.

    Dr. Cheryl Bacon, chair of the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication, says students and faculty already are working to achieve the goal. A team of faculty and student researchers and developers from multiple departments at the university plan to have the Optimist ready for the iPad by the end of March. Optimist editors plan to employ the new platform to deliver a more converged form of media to the ACU community in addition to the print, online and iPhone app versions of the Optimist.

         
  • Posted: 02 February 2010 09:21 PM #10

    Excellent thread; I hope that it will see many contributors.  Thanks, MacB.

    There are at least two separate education markets, each with differing opportunities but both of them with huge potential:  University education and secondary education.

    In the U.S. secondary schools are buying huge numbers of netbooks at price points not far below the iPad.  Apple already has the sales force in place for this market.  And the acceptance of the Apple brand is beyond question.  Furthermore the administrators will absolutely love the level of control over applications that is possible with the iPad.

    One feature that might help here (and in other situations as well) is the ability to attach a cable lock to the iPad case much like one does with a bicycle.

         
  • Posted: 02 February 2010 09:54 PM #11

    Textbook publishers have made a deal with Scrollmotion to be able to have product ready for iPad:

    http://www.engadget.com/2010/02/02/major-textbook-pubs-partner-with-scrollmotion-for-ipad-developme/

         
  • Posted: 03 February 2010 12:02 AM #12

    The new medium, from paper to electronic, does not by itself imply a lower price for textbooks, but merely a lower cost of distribution What will lower the cost of textbooks is more choice, but Calculus and Analytical Geometry by T. Finney 7th edition (Addison Wesley) can not compete with Calculus and Analytical Geometry by T. Finney 8th edition (Addison Wesley). Good luck selling the 7th edition, when the requirement is the 8th edition.

    Not just a lower cost of distribution: a much longer revenue-earning period for each textbook. This completely removes the incentive to constantly revise books; textbook authors hate the extra work as much as anyone else. Competition between publishers should preserve a reasonable standard of price fairness. (I worked in higher ed publishing for years, and going after an established title on the basis of price is not unusual at all.) The issue of perception is important here: students are perceiving that a digital textbook is a less expensive product to produce than a bound book; therefore it stands to reason that if the digital version is not priced accordingly, students and faculty alike are going to holler.

    There is also the added benefit that a digital textbook could be updated as easily as a web page. A new accounting regulation is passed or another financial institution hits the wall, and zip, the author can send appropriate updates right out to students. In fact, with no physical product to produce, the whole idea of “editions” starts to lose its relevance. Professors still need to know that their exams and lectures are compatible with the text, but as far as the students are concerned, the book is the book ? they can’t help but have the newest “edition” no matter what.

         
  • Posted: 03 February 2010 04:11 AM #13

    Hmmm….there is one possible negative fallout from all this: the print-business will, eventually, get a hard knock on the head when this concept matures… on the other hand: think of it! You have an iPad and several subscriptions (newspapers etc). Everyday a new issue will be pushed to your iPad by the publishers: a whole new business-model will evolve from this.  You could even publish the New York Times in different languages, even on the fly.

         
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    Posted: 03 February 2010 08:19 AM #14

    awcabot - 02 February 2010 11:04 PM

    The new medium, from paper to electronic, does not by itself imply a lower price for textbooks, but merely a lower cost of distribution What will lower the cost of textbooks is more choice, but Calculus and Analytical Geometry by T. Finney 7th edition (Addison Wesley) can not compete with Calculus and Analytical Geometry by T. Finney 8th edition (Addison Wesley).

    Slightly off-topic: When I was studying engineering, for a few classes I never bought the book.  My strategy was to find an earlier edition in the library and repeatedly check it our for the 10 week quarter. And photocopied the homework out of the current edition that was on reserve in the university library.  :wink:

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  • Posted: 03 February 2010 10:11 AM #15

    WSJ: Scrollmotion to handle textbooks for the iPad
    Seth Weintraub
    |
    February 02, 2010

    The Wall Street Journal tonight reports that Scrollmotion, a company we’ve profiled before and you can see at the WWDC 2009 event above, will be building eTextbooks for a number of publishers.

    “People have been talking about the impact of technology on education for 25 years. It feels like it is really going to happen in 2010,” said Rik Kranenburg, group president of higher education for the education unit of McGraw-Hill Cos. and one of the publishers involved in the project. Other publishers include Houghton Mifflin Harcourt K-12, which is a unit of Education Media & Publishing Group Ltd.; Pearson PLC’s Pearson Education, and Washington Post Co.‘s Kaplan Inc., known for its test-prep and study guides.

    Scrollmotion has been involved with the App Store since its inception and has turned lots of big publishers’ books into apps.  You can see in the video above how their textbook software works.

    It’s also unclear whether ScrollMotion will emerge as the leading applications provider, with many others in the works. A closely held New York-based firm, ScrollMotion has already developed applications for Apple’s iPhone and iPod Touch. ScrollMotion takes digital files provided by publishers for the iPad, adapts them to fit on the device, and then adds enhancements such as a search function, dictionaries, glossaries, interactive quizzes and page numbers.

    We had actually wondered if Apple had picked up Scrollmotion because their iBookstore looked very similar to Scrollmotion’s Iceberg reader.  The news is good for Apple and the book market as Apple doesn’t seem to need to be the only player.

    Video here