Using macOS Catalina Hands Free to Design a Logo

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It’s a short video, but developer Camera Cundiff tweeted a video in which he used macOS Catalina Hands Free to design a simple logo.

video: time-lapse screencast, dictating commands to XD via macOS voice control, demonstrating the use of Number and Grid targeting to create overlapping shapes and type.

Hands Free is such a powerful feature, and combined with Siri makes the Mac feel like a Star Trek computer.

Photoshop for iPad Opens for Beta Signups

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Adobe is officially inviting users to sign up for Photoshop for iPad as beta testers, via an email sent to Creative Cloud users.

Real Photoshop is coming to the iPad so you can create something unreal. All your familiar desktop tools and workflows are at your fingertips, from retouching and compositing to spot healing and blend modes. Layers? They’re all here. Resolution? No difference. Your PSDs are exactly the same, whether you’re working on your desktop or a mountain top.

Adobe has been emailing Creative Cloud customers, but you can join the beta program by filling this form.

Adobe Launches Premiere Rush CC Video Editor for Mac, iPhone, and iPad

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If you want a consumer-friendly video editor on your Mac, iPhone and iPad, but iMovie isn’t your thing, Adobe has a new app for you to check out: Premiere Rush CC. The app launched at Adobe MAX on Monday. It includes the video editing tools you need to record and edit, adjust or add audio, and share your movies on social networks. It uses Adobe Creative Cloud to sync files so you can switch devices while editing, too. I’ve been using the beta and it’s pretty impressive. You can try Premiere Rush CC for free. It’s priced at US$9.99 a month for individuals, $19.99 a month for teams, and $29.99 a month for enterprise.

Adobe Launches Premiere Rush CC Video Editor for Mac, iPhone, and iPad

Want to Be Terrified? Watch This University Demo That Fakes a President Speaking

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I know it’s coming. I know it’s unavoidable. But that doesn’t keep me from being terrified of this inevitable future when fake things are indistinguishable from reality. Adobe has its VoCo technology in testing—and that’s scary enough, but now University of Washington researchers have demonstrated the ability to to match speech to a generated video. In the demonstration video, they used real speech from former president Barack Obama and matched it to artificially generated video of him speaking those same words. It’s easy to see this tech being used to match falsified speech to falsified video. And while there are some aspects of UW’s artificially generated video that look fake, this is a demonstration, not a finished product. Within a few years, the ability to perfectly fake video and speech together will be available on our smartphones. The end result will be an ever-greater cynicism towards never believing anything you see. It’s inevitable, scary, and the technology is impressive as all heck. It will also be a huge test of democracy. Not only can someone anyone be made to say something they didn’t, anyone could also deny saying something they really did say, claiming to be the victim of this technology. The Atlantic has a good story with a lot more information on the university project.