We Need a New Internet That Can Withstand Climate Change

· · Link

The internet infrastructure is vulnerable to climate change. The fiber optic cables that ferry data can handle some water damage, but they weren’t meant to be permanently underwater.

…within the next 15 years, in a scenario that projects about a foot of sea level rise by then, 4,067 miles of fiber conduit cables are likely to be permanently underwater. In New York, Los Angeles, and Seattle, the rising seas could drown roughly 20 percent of all metro fiber conduit. These are the lines that physically ferry our Internet traffic from place to place.

Another 1,101 “nodes”—the buildings or places where cables rise out of the ground, which often house computer servers, routers, and network switches to move our data around—are also expected to be swamped.

The Splinternet is Growing Bigger

· · Link

The splinternet, also known as cyberbalkanization, refers to how governments split the World Wide Web into national internets.

It’s not just authoritarian countries trying to bend the global web to national values. The same social media companies that gave rise to unrest in the Middle East have come under fire in the West for allowing their services to be used to promote hatred and terrorism. In response, England and Australia have recently passed laws demanding tech firms provide easier access to web users’ communications.

Sometimes I think that in the future there will be no internet. There won’t be a web browser, there will just be apps that are easier to censor and control.

The Internet's 768K Day Approaches. What is THAT?

· · Link

Global internet

ZDNet writes:

The term 768k Day comes from the original mother of all internet outages known as 512k Day.

512k Day happened on August 12, 2014, when hundreds of ISPs from all over the world went down, causing billions of dollars in damages due to lost trade and fees, from a lack of internet connectivity or packet loss

This time we’re much better prepared. However,

There will certainly be some network operators and corporate end-user organizations who will be caught unaware and will experience problems…

Here's How Panic Solved a Download Problem and Showed Why Net Neutrality is So Important

· · Cool Stuff Found

Panic, the company behind Transmit, Coda, and Firewatch, had a mystery on its hands: why were its app downloads so slow for a lot of users? They dug into it and found the problem was specific to Comcast customers—and they got Comcast to fix it. The story is a great example of how interdependent internet service providers and the companies providing the bandwidth pipes are. It’s also a perfect example of what an internet without Net Neutrality is like. Panic’s video explaining what happened is worth watching, and you can learn more about what happened on the company’s blog.

Burger King's Net Neutrality Explanation with Whoppers is Brilliant

· · Cool Stuff Found

If you know people who aren’t grasping what the repeal of Net Neutrality means, try hitting them in the stomach. Figuratively, of course. Fast food giant Burger King has an awesome video that makes it much easier to understand the ramifications of an internet without Net Neutrality using hamburgers as an example. It’s only a couple minutes long, but that’s more than enough time to get the point across. This is one of the clearest, and most entertaining, Net Neutrality explanations we’ve seen so far.

4 Tricks for Using Bookmarks Folders in Safari

· · Quick Tip

For today’s Quick Tip, we’re going to cover some features of bookmarks folders in Safari on the Mac. Using a few handy-dandy shortcuts, you can open a bunch of your sites in new tabs or replace the existing ones! Just don’t do one thing when you meant to do the other, all right?