Amazon's Echo Show, FBI's iPhone Hack Price Tag - TMO Daily Observations 2017-05-09

· · The Mac Observer's Daily Observations Podcast

TMO Daily Observations

Amazon unveiled its Echo Show, and it has a display. Bryan Chaffin and the Maccast’s Adam Christianson join Jeff Gamet to share their reactions to Amazon’s newest Alexa device. They also have some thoughts on the unintended confirmation that the FBI paid $900,000 for the San Bernardino iPhone hack, plus Bryan coins “I’m gonna up that up.”

FBI Paid $900K for San Bernardino iPhone Hack

· · News

Cellebrite's servers hit with data breach

The FBI refused to ever share how much it paid for the hack into San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook’s iPhone, but thanks to Senator Diane Feinstein we now know the price was US$900,000. The Senator accidentally spilled the beans during a Judiciary Committee meeting on accessing encrypted data on smartphones and personal computers.

Senator Feinstein Revives Encryption Back Door Bill with FBI Support

· · Analysis

Senator Diane Feinstein pushes law requiring tech companies to give law enforcement access to our private encrypted data and communications

Senator Dianne Feinstein is dusting off her bill aimed at forcing technology companies to give the U.S. government access to the encrypted data on our smartphones, tablets, and computers. FBI Director James Comey is on board with her plan saying the inability to access our encrypted data is a major security threat to the country.

Could Facebook Become the New Web of Trust? Maybe!

· · Deep Dive

Facebook and the Web of Trust

Jeff Butts has never been a fan of OpenPGP, because the Web of Trust it relies upon is, well, unreliable. That might change, because Jeff has discovered a feature in Facebook that could allow the social media giant to become the new Web of Trust.

Britain's Home Secretary Pushes for Encryption Back Door

· · Analysis

Cellebrite's servers hit with data breach

British Home Secretary Amber Rudd says it’s time for technology companies to give law enforcement a way to decrypt private communications because terrorists shouldn’t have a way to secretly chat. Her comments come in the wake of a terrorist attack in London where five people were killed.

UK Anti-encryption Push, Woz at Startup World Cup - TMO Daily Observations 2017-03-27

· · The Mac Observer's Daily Observations Podcast

TMO Daily Observations

There’s a new government call to for tech companies to let law enforcement bypass our security and encryption, but this time it’s from the United Kingdom. Bryan Chaffin and Jeff Butts join Jeff Gamet to look at the ramifications if the U.K. forces the issue, plus Bryan fills us in on Steve Wozniak’s presentation at Startup World Cup.

Web Pages as Apps, Equipment Insurance, and Photos! – Mac Geek Gab 649

· & · Mac Geek Gab Podcast

Have a webpage you use all the time? Why not make that its own, separate app? Need to create Symbolic Links (symlinks) but don’t want to use the Terminal? How about if you want to get an equipment warranty for that new Synology NAS you just bought? That’s just a sampling of the things you’ll learn in the first segment of this week’s episode. There’s more, folks. Lots more! Press play and enjoy!

Hackers Post Cellebrite's Smartphone Cracking Tools Online

· · News

UFED hacking tools

A hacker dumped 900GB of hacking tools and data used by Cellebrite. The cache of data is on Pastebin, for now, at least. Cellebrite is an Israeli security company that came to public prominence when the FBI used its services to hack into the San Bernadino shooter’s iPhone.

Cellebrite Hacked, Reaffirming Apple's iOS No-backdoor Stance

· · Analysis

Cellebrite's servers hit with data breach

A year ago the FBI was pushing to force Apple into making a hackable version of iOS for a terrorist investigation while claiming the code would stay secure. Now Cellebrite—the company the FBI reportedly hired to break through the iPhone’s encryption—has been hacked, validating Apple’s concerns the tools would eventually leak.

Apple Posts Its Public Encryption Key, Encourages Customers to Verify Emails

· · Cool Stuff Found

Apple has a new support document encouraging customers to verify encrypted emails, especially security emails from Apple. The document includes Apple’s own public PGP key for those verifications. Apple noted that its current PGP key will be valid until May of 2018. PGP, or “pretty good privacy” is one of the most popular encryption schemes in general use today, through both the PGP Corporation and the open source GnuPGP. Apple posted links to both. You can subscribe to Apple’s Security-announce emails at Apple’s website.

Apple Posts Its Public Encryption Key, Encourages Customers to Verify Emails