Use a Password Manager to Store Your Driver's License and Passport

Storing your driver’s license or passport information on your computer in a text file or as a photograph may be convenient, but it also makes it easier for anyone with access to your hard drive—including hackers—to steal your identity. Modern password managers, like 1Password and LastPass, solve that problem by encrypting your sensitive data and keeping it away from prying eyes.

iOS 10: How to Use Your iPhone as a Magnifying Lens

If you really stretch the whole “the best camera is the one you have with you” thing, you can say the same about magnifying lenses, too. Since your iPhone is always with you—hence, the best camera line—why not use it as a magnifying lens, too? That’s exactly what you can do in iOS 10.

How I Turned a Bunch of Drawings into iOS 10 Sticker Packs

What happens when you tell artists they can make sticker packs for iOS 10 Messages easily? They do, and I took that as an invitation, so I went through the process of creating two sticker packs to learn how the process works. It’s a win-win scenario, because I know a lot more about what developers experience, and you get two sticker packs.

Mail: Using "Erase Deleted Items"

Mail on the Mac is the subject of this Quick Tip, and we’re gonna discuss how to clear out your trash in moments. We’ll also go over setting how long each of your accounts waits before it empties its own trash automatically. That’ll help you keep stuff neat and clean, too!

Seeing a Folder's Size in the Terminal

Mac Geek Gab listener Daryn is interested in seeing the size of both files and folders when using the Terminal. We’ll help him utilize the ‘du’ command to glean that information, and then we’ll talk about how to do that in Recovery Mode where ‘du’ isn’t readily available.

Avoid Endless Scrolling: How to Quickly Return to the Top of a Page in iOS

Have you ever scrolled all the way to the bottom of a long webpage or list on your iPhone, only to realize that you need to return to the top? You could start rapidly swiping your finger on the screen to scroll back up to the top, or you could use a handy little trick to instantly jump to the beginning. Mac Geek Gab listener Scott provides today’s Quick Tip that every iOS user should know.

OS X: Renaming a Bluetooth Device

If one of your Bluetooth devices (like your Magic Keyboard or Magic Mouse) has a name you aren’t fond of, how do you change it? The process is a bit different than it used to be, so we’re going to go over what you’ll do!

How to Tell Which Leaked iPhone Photos are Fake

As September 7th’s iPhone 7 launch looms ever closer we’re seeing more and more leaked photos showing what claim to be photos of Apple’s soon to be announced next generation smartphone. Those photos may be fun to see, but there’s a good chance they’re fake and it doesn’t take much to suss them out when you know what to look for.

Edit Playlist Columns in iTunes 12.4 and Later

Every update to iTunes seems to refine a useful feature out of the interface, and as I created a new playlist in iTunes this morning I found yet another. All new Playlists are stuck in “Playlist” view, which has a limited selection of columns and no obvious way to customize them. No worries, you can still customize them, you just have to change your View first. We’ll show you how.

Touch ID Trick: Train Multiple Fingerprints at Once

Apple’s Touch ID is an excellent security convenience, allowing you to quickly unlock your iPhone or iPad without having to type in your Passcode. Most of us will want to train at least the index finger and thumb of both hands in order to have some unlocking flexibility. That requires adding each fingerprint manually, and the iPhone only allows five total fingerprints to be trained. What if you want to train more than five fingers? Or what if you want to make the training process more efficient? In Sunday’s Mac Geek Gab 616, listener Robin provided an answer to these questions: train multiple fingerprints simultaneously.

Pokémon GO: Can't Catch More Pokémon? Clear Out Your List

My first experience playing Pokémon happened when I installed Pokémon GO on my iPhone, and it didn’t take long before I discovered “gotta catch ’em all” doesn’t mean you have to catch every one you see. I quickly hit my 250 Pokémon storage limit, mostly with Pidgeys, but also found you can offload as many as you like to make room for that Pikachu you really want. Read on to learn how.