Twitter, Instagram, and Others Agree to Pay $5.3 Million for Privacy Obnoxiousness

· · Cool Stuff Found

Several social media companies have agreed to a US$5.3 million settlement for being obnoxious about user privacy. The suit stems from 2012, when Twitter, Instagram, Yelp, Foursquare, Kik, Path, Gowalla, and Foodspotting all took advantage of the way iOS worked at the time. More specifically, these companies sucked up our Contacts without telling us. iOS later required user permission to access our Contacts. The settlement was reported by Law360, who said the $5.3 million would be used to pay out damages to people who downloaded the above-mentioned apps between 2009 and 2012. What that means is the attorneys in the case get a phat paycheck, the companies get a slap on the wrist, and the millions of users who downloaded those apps will get pennies. Yay!

Twitter, Instagram, and Others Agree to Pay $5.3 Million for Privacy Obnoxiousness

TMO Staff Share their Favorite VPN Services

· · News

The Mac Observer staff shares their favorite VPN, or virtual private network, services

Thanks to a new law green lighting ISPs selling our personal web browsing data, along with restrictions prohibiting the FCC from stopping the activity, there’s a lot of talk about VPNs, or Virtual Private Networks. With so many VPN services to choose from it’s hard to decide which is best for you, so I asked the TMO staff what they rely on.

Now Would Be a Great Time for an Apple VPN

· · The Back Page

If Apple Operated a VPN

There are many things Bryan Chaffin wishes Apple would release. Streaming TV, a smarthome hub, new freaking Macs, the list goes on. But something new on his mind is an Apple owned and operated virtual private network (VPN). He explains why this would be a welcome port in the storm of surveillance capitalism.

5 Things to Consider when Evaluating a VPN for Privacy

· · Deep Dive

Yesterday we explained what a VPN is and covered the benefits of using one. Today we’re examining how to figure out if you have a trustworthy VPN provider. In place of your ISP, your VPN provider receives your browsing data, and it’s good to shop around and compare privacy policies. Andrew Orr tells us what to look out for.

What Is A VPN, And How Can It Help You?

· · Deep Dive

Now that Congress have chosen to allow ISPs to sell your data, many people are turning to VPNs to help. But you may not know how VPNs work, or how a VPN can help you browse the web safely. In this article Andrew Orr explores the technical details and gives you our VPN recommendations.

Britain's Home Secretary Pushes for Encryption Back Door

· · Analysis

Cellebrite's servers hit with data breach

British Home Secretary Amber Rudd says it’s time for technology companies to give law enforcement a way to decrypt private communications because terrorists shouldn’t have a way to secretly chat. Her comments come in the wake of a terrorist attack in London where five people were killed.

UK Anti-encryption Push, Woz at Startup World Cup - TMO Daily Observations 2017-03-27

· · The Mac Observer's Daily Observations Podcast

TMO Daily Observations

There’s a new government call to for tech companies to let law enforcement bypass our security and encryption, but this time it’s from the United Kingdom. Bryan Chaffin and Jeff Butts join Jeff Gamet to look at the ramifications if the U.K. forces the issue, plus Bryan fills us in on Steve Wozniak’s presentation at Startup World Cup.

Apple Already Patched Most CIA Hacks From Wikileaks Report

· · News

iPhone and bug

According to the Wikileaks Vault 7 information dump, the CIA has been hard at work developing hacks to get into the data on our iPhones. Most of the exploits listed in the report, however, are already patched and Apple is working on taking care of the remaining few.